Omni Precious Metals

January 8, 2013
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Gold-filled jewelry

Gold-filled jewelry, also known as “rolled gold” or “rolled gold plate” is composed of a solid layer of gold bonded with heat and pressure to a base metal such as brass. Some high quality gold-filled pieces have the same appearance as 14 karat (58%) gold. In the USA the quality of gold filled is defined by the Federal Trade Commission. If the gold layer is 10 kt fineness the minimum layer of karat gold in an item stamped GF must equal at least 1/10 the weight of the total item. If the gold layer is 12 kt or higher the minimum layer of karat gold in an item stamped GF must equal at least 1/20 the weight of the total item. The most common stamps found on gold-filled jewelry are 1/20 12kt GF and 1/20 14kt GF. Also common is 1/10 10kt. Some products are made using sterling silver as the base, although this more expensive version is not common today.

“Double clad” gold-filled sheet is produced with 1/2 the thickness of gold on each side. 1/20 14Kt double clad gold-filled has a layer on each side of 1/40th 14Kt making the total content of gold 1/20. The thinner layer on each side does not wear as well as single clad gold-filled.

The Federal Trade Commission allows the use of “Rolled Gold Plate” or “R.G.P”. on items with lower thicknesses of gold than are required for “gold-filled.” A 12 kt gold layer that is 1/60 the weight of the total item is designated as 1/60 12kt RGP. This lower quality does not wear as well as gold-filled items.

January 8, 2013
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Introduction to financial spread betting

Financial spread betting is a type of derivative product that allows you to trade on the price movements of the financial markets, rises or falls. It has become increasingly popular in recent years.

Alpari (UK) offers spread betting clients a range of tools and resources to help them make the most of their online spread betting strategy.

January 8, 2013
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What Is Precious Metals Trading?

The process of trading has evolved considerably over the centuries. Trading, or bartering, was the first form of exchanging one possession for another. Many things have been traded in history, beginning with goods like animal hides and seashells. Trading evolved into not just a necessity for life, but a luxury as well.

It shifted to include hobbies and pastimes like trading stamps, coins, baseball cards, and marbles. In our recent history, trading is a word that runs hand in hand with stocks and bonds.

One form that you may not be very familiar with is precious metals trading. A precious metal is a rare, naturally occurring element that holds high value. Some examples are gold, silver, and platinum.

January 8, 2013
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Base metal

In chemistry, the term base metal is used informally to refer to a metal that oxidizes or corrodes relatively easily, and reacts variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen. Examples include iron, nickel, lead and zinc. Copper is considered a base metal as it oxidizes relatively easily, although it does not react with HCl.
Base is used in the sense of low-born, in opposition to noble or precious metal. In alchemy, a base metal was a common and inexpensive metal, as opposed to precious metals, mainly gold and silver. A long-time goal of the alchemists was the transmutation of base metal into precious metal.